Financial Crisis: Akilaria RC1 hull number 41 is for sale

Financial Crisis, sail number 41, registered name "Mowgli" is for sale by
owner. Currently engaged in the Global Ocean Race the boat is viewable at
any of the remaining stopovers, Wellington, Punta del Este, Charleston or
Europe at the end of the race with an opportunity for the new owner for a
test sail or even joining one of the remaining legs of the race as
co-skipper.

I have invested all my funds in putting together this campaign, but
unfortunately I am struggling to see the race through having been unable
to raise any further sponsorship since leaving Palma.

The albatrosses are getting bigger - is that good or bad?

We've now been at sea for 8 days, many of which are just a blur. In the
last few we've been reaching in fairly stable winds and it gets a bit
monotonous. I'm in no way complaining as it looks like we're going to get
our backs kicked in a few days by a cold front with strong and gusty winds
so we may as well enjoy the easy ride for now.

I've taken the chance to eat more than in the previous days and add as
much as possible to the rest and energy bank as i'm sure we still have to
see a lot worse than so far.

Our distance to Phesheya has been fairly constant but we've lost VHF and
AIS contact which is a shame as a friendly voice in the middle of the
ocean really makes your day.

Deep ocean match racing continues

It's another pleasant sail today in the Southern Ocean, reaching west in
warm Northerly winds. We are sailing with Phesheya Racing in sight just
behind our stern now, we chatted on VHF a few times exchanging jokes and
banter, which is really nice, sharing the adventure with your competitors
i think is part of this great race.

On the VHF chat we all expressed our gratitude for the extremely nice
conditions that we are being blessed with and which should be with us
another while still as it seems we'll manage to keep with this weather
system for a few days... we really cannot complain.

Southern Ocean randez vous between Financial Crisis and Phesheya Racing

After six days of racing i have a sense of deja vu, the three new boats
are at the front and here futher back we are nearly in visual contact with
Phesheya Racing which is about 7 miles to our port, we had a brief radio
chat and as we are converging we should actually see them pretty soon...
the same had happened by the Gibriltar and again by the coast of Morocco
in leg one. The two boats are same design and same speed and it makes it
real special in the solitude of the Southern Ocean to have your fellow
racers and friends close by...

It's another very pleasant sunny day and we should enjoy stable and
relatively light conditions for a few days ahead.

A welcome break in hot sunshine and gentle winds

After days of being punished and thrown around things have definitely
turned for the better, we have emerged from our dry suits stinking like
dead rats and are enjoying a lovely spinnaker run in a hot sunshine and
gentle 20-25 knots of wind. I guess conditions like this will be
exceptional but who says we cant enjoy them while they last.

Both Hugo and I have found ourselves needing quite a lot of catching up
with sleep but feeling a million times better every time we squeeze in a
few restful hours. I still think the emotional roller coaster of the first
few days was a combination of fear of the unknown, apprehension and
immediate physical exhaustion while being thrown around in wet horrible
conditions...

The way to diet: Non surgical gastric bands

If you are looking at a non-surgical equivalent to a gastric band look no
further, come to the great south where we'll make you feel a constant knot
around your stomach to lose weight. In the past few days it's been either
windy or freaking windy, and as far as I understand this still absolutely
nothing compared to what we might get.

Yesterday we got caught small spinnaker up in a front with gusts up to 45
knots and had to wrestle the thing down, we just discussed the strategy
for the night and we really have to balance speed with safety and gear
preservation, it still is a long long way to Wellington and with no land
in sight any major breakages would mean a very very long limp to the
finish.

Finally flying in the right direction after a windless night

We spent the night in a windless hole with a 2-3 knots current dragging us
west, we can only blame lack of research and preparation for not knowing
about this adverse river in our way, i guess everyone had to cross it but
we certainly got the worst of it as we had no wind at all to reach the
other side of the stream. In the morning the wind finally filled, we
initially hoisted the A2 masthead spinnaker, but quickly the wind clocked
to the south west and the angle was too shy.

An emotional roller coaster in the grips of the south easterlies

I didnt have the easiest of starts, mentally, I think the stress in
getting things ready in Cape Town wore me out and I have to admit to a
very tough first 48 hours.

A tough start for leg 2 of the Global Ocean Race

We're at sea admiring a beautiful sunset and in the distance we can just
make Cape Good Hope that we are leaving behind us, this will most likely
be the last piece of land we'll see till we arrive in New Zealand.

My mood the day of the start was far than relaxed. I was apprehensive and
my mouth was dry, we are venturing towards the mysterious Southern
Ocean... The first night was tough, after a light patch of wind west of
Cape Town in the lee of Table Mountain the dreaded South Easter was
blowing 25-30 knots right on our noses and beating into the horrible seas
was many degrees of separations away from the word pleasant.

Marco Nannini and Hugo Ramon ready to set off for leg 2 of the Global Ocean Race

I cannot believe it has been over three weeks since we arrived to Cape Town, time seems to have dissipated like the clouds that blow over Table Mountain when the Southeaster blows hard in Town. Repairs to the boat were finally completed just a few days ago, the food supplies replenished and the boat checked over for signs of wear and breakages. Tomorrow we'll finally set off for one of the two dreaded Southern Ocean legs, apprehension always lingers at the back of your mind but this is what we came to experience.

Severe weather forecast for Cape Horn in 48 hours

Our moment of glory as leaders of the Global Ocean Race was short-lived,
as predicted the reaching conditions favoured the newer more powerful
Cessna who simply pulled away averaging 1-2 knots faster despite our every
effort to bear away and sail as fast as possible. Now finally the wind has
turned round and we are sailing downwind but unfortunately we are paying
the price of our torn masthead spinnaker so again we are losing ground,
we'll need a bit of luck after the horn for a chance to catch up again.

Today however my thoughts are far more preoccupied with something else,
there's a storm brewing due to be sweep across Cape Horn exactly at the
same time as we expect to go round. The centre of a deep depression
would be centred in the middle of Drake Passage with very strong
south-south-esterly winds blowing at the horn. The weather files show
sustained winds of around 40 knots due in 48 hours but the reality is that
we should expect far more than this, after the cold front the unstable air
mass could mean winds gusting 60-70 knots or more. We would need to stay
off the continental shelf to avoid the worst of the steep waves that form
where the sea bed rises sharply, much the same way as in the Bay of
Biscay, unsurprisingly another nasty place in bad weather. Given the wind
direction it would be easy to be pushed over the shelf and find ourselves
struggling to keep away from land and unable to ride the storm with no
space to run downwind.

Even now with a forcast 15 knots we already have 20 gusting up to 26 and
typically grib weather files underestimate extreme weather so it is a bit
of a lottery to know exactly what we would be in for.

Serious weather would be certainly frightening, possibly not life
threatening but undoubtedly the risk of damage would be high. An option
would be to slow down or even stop for a while to ensure the low pressure
system displaces to the east of us so that once we resume our course we
will know the weather is on it's way to improve rather than taking the
risk of being cornered and trapped with no easy way out.

We have to make a decision within the next 12 hours otherwise we will have
gone to far to avoid the worst that is forecast to come. Deciding to stop
would cost us around 24 hours, certainly not an easy decision to take but
having come so far we really need to ensure we can finish this race. We
will review our options tomorrow after the new weather data is available.

My boat was raced as Mowgli in the previous edition of the Global Ocean
Race and I think they were caught in very strong winds and seas in the
second leg of the race, the waves breaking over the back of the boat
whilst

Marco We are so proud of you by First ClassSailing (not verified)
It looks like a bad rounding by Wideload (not verified)