Marco Nannini launches Italian yachting operations after GOR

Gulf of La Spezia, Italy, July 2013

After a 14 day delivery from the UK to Italy, my dad and I docked at "Marina del Fezzano", the location I have chosen to set up my italian yachting operations, dedicated to offshore yacht sailing and racing using the Akilaria RC1 Class40 I sailed into second place at the 2011/2012 Global Ocean Race.  

Life after the GOR: Class40s, Minis and the idea of a Italian training camp...

 

WHAT HAVE I BEEN UP TO?

It's been a while since i last posted an update. When not rounding the Horn, I found the cold winter months are best spent in front of a cosy fire with a good glass of wine and good non-freeze-dried food. Following the Global Ocean Race (GOR) 2011/2012 I have been invited to several yacht clubs in Italy to hold talks about my adventure and tribulations on board my Class40 "Financial Crisis". I held talks in Torino, Padova, Verona, Vicenza, Molfetta, Meina, Lovere as well as for the Soroptimist club in Turin and the Rotary Club in Padova. Next week a further date on the calendar, 4th of April, in Genova, Italy and then onto Bologna in May.

Ideas for a Christmas present: a Class40 for less than £100k

If you've been a good boy this year why not treat yourself to a nice Christmas present, for less than 100k you could get yourself a fabulous Akilaria RC1 Class40, proven and reliable it is in fact probably the only 40ft racing boat in the world to have rounded Cape Horn twice in its five years of successful offshore racing. Third in the inaugural round the world Portimao Global Ocean Race 2008/2009, Second overall in the 2010 Round Britain and Ireland, campaigned in the pro circuit at the Route du Rhum 2010 and sailed triumphantly into Les Sables d'Olonne into second place overall at the 2011/2012 Global Ocean Race so much so that it was named Best British Yacht Overseas of the year by the RORC.

See you in Vicenza on the 26th November, Verona 27th, Padova 28th

Three talks is Vicenza, Verona and Padova on 26-27-28 November. See you there!

26 Novembre 2012 ore 21:00 - VICENZA

Sala del Capitolo, Palazzo del Monte di Pieta'
Piazza dei signori - Vicenza
Scarica la locandina di Vicenza

www.marconannini.com/Nannini_Vicenza26112012.jpg

 

27 Novembre 2012 ore 21:00 - VERONA
Sala Convegni Unicredit - Via Garibaldi 2, Verona
Scarica la locandina di Verona

www.marconannini.com/Nannini_Verona27112012.jpg

 

28 Novembre 2012 ore 21:00 - PADOVA
Palazzo Del Turismo - Centro Congressi
Via Scavi 14, 35036 Montegrotto Terme (PD)

Scarica la locandina di Padova

www.marconannini.com/Nannini_Padova28112012.jpg

After the wedding bells, a new series of talks about the Global Ocean Race will begin

On October 25th Ella and I got married in the stunning setting of Belfast City Hall and Belfast Castle, the celebrations are ongoing with a big party with my Italian friends tomorrow in Turin. Immediately after, however, it'll be time again to talk about the great ocean,  preparations are underway for a new series of talks about the Global Ocean Race. 

RORC names Financial Crisis (Marco Nannini) as best British Yacht Overseas

I am delighted to let you all know that the RORC has picked me for this year's Dennis P Miller Trophy for best British Yacht Overseas in recognition of my mostly self-funded Global Ocean Race campaign. I am very grateful. My trusty "Financial Crisis" has made it in the history books and it is a shame that she is for sale.

Class40 GBR41 - Financial Crisis is for sale (price reduction)

Following my successful Global Ocean Race campaign, taking 2nd overal, my Class40 named Financial Crisis is sadly for sale.

Launched in 2007, Financial Crisis is an Akilaria RC1 designed by Mark Lombard and built by MC-Tec and a Lorima carbon mast new in in 2011.

Strong, reliable, proven, excellent inventory, ready to race. 

For Sale at £99,000 + VAT ono

For further information call +393204093306 or email marco.nannini@yahoo.co.uk

 

Closing the circle

I'm finally back in London, I guess this really closes the circle. Yesterday Ella and I arrived in Haslar Marina in Portsmouth Harbour after a rather tough delivery. I must admit I'm really glad to be back, it's been a tough long past 10 months and after the great adventure some normality seems a real luxury.

Celebrating a circumnavigation in Les Sables D'Olonne

It's hard to believe I've been in Les Sables for 5 days since finishing the final leg of the Global Ocean Race, I had promised an update soon after arriving but the days have passed very quickly with all the celebrations, time spent with my family, with my fiancee Ella and a surprise visit from a group of friends from Italy. All in all the dust has not settled yet, I think it'll take some time for life to find its new pace after the Global Ocean Race but here I am, I can really say it now, I have circumnavigated the planet!!!

Sail damage in serious nose dive during storm

I've just had a dinner of rice with a thai green sauce and a peanut bar
for desert, slowly recovering from the busy day. The gale we faced
yesterday left us with a few issues to deal with. We had chosen a route
that kept us away from the very worst of the deepening depression but as
we sailed deeper into the low the wind was steadily above 40 knots and
gusting occasionally at nearly 50 knots.

We had been rather conservative in every step, we furled the solent quite
early on when the wind was still building, unfortunately the furling drum
was wrapped with a spinnaker sheet and it took a minute or two to resolve,
when it came to furling the sail we were hit by a gust and the violent
flogging put a tear in the leach of the sail. We havent been able to
assess the damage yet but hopefully it should be quite easily repairable,
we just need to find a window of calm weather to deal with it.

The wind built rapidly and we spent a lont time with 3 reefs in the main
and the staysail and still occasionally taking off massive surfs at 18 and
occasionally even 20 knots. We were mainly below with the hatch closed as
several waves broke in the cockpit...

The sea state deteriorated quite rapidly and occasionally we were hit by
larger than average cross waves. All seemed perfectly under control until
we sailed down the face of one of thes monsters, we started surfing
almost vertiacally until the bottom of the wave where we buried the bow
very violently. Sergio in his bunk was thrown forward by the sudden
deceleration but luckily was sleeping feet first and wasnt injured, the
whole boat tilted diagonally and just in that instant where you think
you're about to come upright the very wave that had sent us surfing broke
over the boat in a thunderous roar.

Eventually the boat re-emerged from the momentary sea burial as if nothing
had happened, those were quite scary instants. We could have done a lot of
damage but other than the fright we thought we had made it thorough
uscathed, that's until I looked out I noticed we had blown the foot of the
staysail, torn open by the force of the water breaking over the deck.

The staysail can be reefed and luckily the damage is contained below the
reef point, so we reefed the sail and continue rather undercanvassed for
the rest of the night. Today as the wind decreased we put the small A5
spinnaker and I took down the staysail to assess the damage. It's quite
bad, with one meter long vertical tear starting from the foot, but i think
with a little patience i can fix it, at least to make it serviceable in
case we need it again...

With two headsails damaged in the space of few hours I spent the day
needle in hand replaying our choices through my head. We had gained on
Phesheya but sustained some damage, yet we had lost lots of miles to
Cessna that seemed to be pushing through as if storms didnt affect them...
that's until midday today, Cessna had clearly stopped in the midst of the
storm, covering just a handful of miles in three hours, what happened? At
the next report they were moving again, ruling out a dismating but their
averages were not compatible with the winds they were in... We reduced our
deficit to them by nearly over 50 miles over the rest of the day and it is
unclear whether they are sailing at full capacity or not...

The race continues, we lick our wounds, we repair the damage and press on,
a final push towards Les Sables D'Olonne. Both men and machines are tired
and we hope to outsail the next depression forming behind and avoid the
strongest winds as its centre moves to the north, this time sailing fast
is the best defence, suits me, i really want to cross that finish line,
now just over 1500 miles away...